Jamie

The Nutrition Facts table is on the side of most packaged foods. It’s often found close to the ingredient listing.

 

The purpose of it is to help consumers make better nutrition decisions. When people can see the number of calories, carbs, sodium, etc. in food, they should be able to eat better, right?

 

This may not sound like the most interesting blog post to read, but there are a lot of changes being made and FINALLY in the right direction! Did you know it’s been over 20 years since they made a change to the nutrition fact tables?? TWENTY YEARS! Food and the way we eat has evolved SO MUCH over this time span.

It’s not perfect, and never will be, but here’s my four-step crash course on reading the Nutrition Facts table and some of the newer changes:

 

Step 1: Serving Size

The absolute most important part of the Nutrition Facts table is to note the serving size. Manufacturers often strategically choose the serving size to make the rest of the table look good. Small serving = small calories/fat/carbs. So, it’s tricky.

All the information in the table rests on the amount chosen as the serving size. And, since every manufacturer chooses their own, it’s often difficult to compare two products.

In the next few years (between 2018-2022), serving sizes will be more consistent between similar foods. This will make it easier to compare foods. The new labels will also have more realistic serving sizes to reflect the amount that people eat in one sitting, and not be artificially small. For example, who actually eats ½ C of ice cream at one time? Companies are starting to increase the serving size on ice cream to ⅔ of a cup….which is still less than most people eat but now everyone will see higher calories, higher sugar, higher fat and if they’ve been paying attention, they’ll wonder what happened!

FUN EXPERIMENT: Try using a measuring cup to see exactly how much of a certain food equals one serving. You may be surprised at how small it is (imagine a ¼ cup of walnuts).

 

Step 2: % Daily Value

The % Daily Value (%DV) is based on the recommended daily amount of each nutrient the average adult needs. Ideally, you will get 100% DV for each nutrient every day. This is added up based on all of the foods and drinks you have throughout the day. NOTE: Since children are smaller and have different nutritional needs if a type of food is intended solely for children under the age of 4, then those foods use a child’s average nutrition needs for the %DV. 

The %DV is a guideline, not a rigid rule. You don’t need to add all of your %DV up for everything you eat all day. Instead, think of anything 5% or less to be a little; and, anything 15% or more to be a lot.

NOTE: Not every nutrient has a %DV. You can see it’s missing for things like cholesterol, sugar, and protein. This is because there isn’t an agreed “official” %DV for those nutrients. The good news is that the newer Nutrition Facts tables will include a %DV for sugar. Keep your eyes out for that.

 

Step 3: Middle of the table (e.g. Calories, fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, carbohydrates, and protein)

Calories are pretty straight forward. Here, a ¼ cup (30 g) of walnuts has 200 calories.

Fat is bolded for a reason. That 19 g of fat (29% DV) is total fat. That includes the non-bolded items underneath it. Here, 19 g of total fat includes 1.5 g saturated fat, (19 g – 1.5 g = 17.5 g) unsaturated fat, and 0 g trans fat. (Yes, unsaturated fats including mono- and poly-unsaturated are not on the label, so you need to do a quick subtraction).

*An AWESOME change, is that they are removing the “calories from fat” section because it is now understood that it’s not just about the calories, but where the fat comes from that is of importance.

Cholesterol, sodium, and potassium are all measured in mg. Ideally, aim for around 100% of potassium and sodium each day. It’s easy to overdo sodium, especially if you grab pre-made, restaurant foods, or snacks. Keep an eye on this number if sodium can be a problem for you (e.g. if your doctor mentioned it, if you have high blood pressure or kidney problems, etc.). If most of your sodium is coming from adding sea salt to your home prepared foods, you probably don’t need to worry about your sodium intake being too high!

Carbohydrate, like fat, is bolded because it is total carbohydrates. It includes the non-bolded items underneath it like fiber, sugar, and starch (not shown). Here, 30 g of walnuts contain 3 g of carbohydrates; that 3 g are all fiber. There is no sugar or starch. And as you can see, 3 g of fiber is 12% of your daily value for fiber.

*It is being recognized that one can not regularly consume a well balanced diet and stay within the proper calorie ranges while consuming more than 10% of total calories from added sugars. For this reason, the %DV of added sugars is being added to the nutrition label. WIN!!!!!

Proteins, like calories, are pretty straight forward as well. Here, a ¼ cup (30 g) of walnuts contains 5 g of protein.

 

Step 4: Bottom of the table (e.g. vitamins & minerals)

The vitamins and minerals listed at the bottom of the table are also straightforward. The new labels will list potassium, calcium, iron, and Vitamin D in their actual amount as opposed to just listing the %DV. . Yes, potassium will drop from the middle of the table to the bottom, and both vitamins A & C will become optional.

Manufacturers can add other vitamins and minerals to the bottom of their Nutrition Facts table (this is optional). And you’ll notice that some foods contain a lot more vitamins and minerals than others do.

 

Conclusion

I hope this crash course in the Nutrition Facts table was helpful. While you can take it or leave it when it comes to making food decisions, it’s here to stay. And it will change slightly over the next few years.

Do you have questions about it? Have you seen the new labels with a %DV for sugar yet?

If you would like to start a conversation about nutrition labels, or really anything nutrition/health related, come join me in my private Facebook group “Wellness Warriors.” We discuss the latest trends in nutrition, share recipes, local grocery store finds for my Howard County folk, and there is a workout of the week posted every Friday if you’re in need of some motivation or a little change in routine!

CLICK HERE to join us!!!

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